Sunday, September 22, 2013

2013 Beekeeping: A Year in Review

  •  April 2013: Main Hive manually split. The Main Hive was shifted to the right, and the new hive was placed to its left, in the main hive's original location. Many bees drifted rightwards into their original hive - even though it had been shifted over - so the hives were swapped. This put the main hive back in its original location, and balanced the hive populations by correcting for drift. The new hive (on the right) was named "Tower 2". The original main hive (on the left) was named Tower 1. 
  • May 2013: A Hawaiian queen was introduced into Tower 2. 
  • May 2013: Tower 2 queenless"A Hui Hou, fair maiden."
  • 2013 May: Tower 1 swarmed. Swarm collected. The swarm was moved 16 kms. to Brian Eden's bee yard behind the experimental farm to settle.
  • May 2013: Tower 1 (after the swarm had departed) raises their own queen.
  • June 2013: Tower 2 (after the Hawaiian queen had been rejected) raises their own queen.
  • June 2013: The swarm which I had collected and moved out to the experimental farm for settling was brought back to my bee yard. I placed it on top of Tower 2 as two-queen colony and named  Tower 2 (Colony 2). The bottom colony was renamed Tower 2 (Colony 1). The structure of the hive was as such: Two deep brood boxes on the bottom, named Tower 2 (Colony 1); a queen excluder on top of those two brood boxes; honey supers on top of the queen excluder; another queen excluder on top of the honey boxes; and finally one deep brood box on the very top named Tower 2 (Colony 2).
  • June 2013: Tower 1 was split again. I moved the split 16 kms. out to Brian Eden's bee yard behind the experimental farm. A Hawaiian queen was introduced to the split while at the experimental farm.
  • June 2013: The (second) split was brought back to my bee yard and named Tower 1 (Colony 2). It was placed on top of Tower 1 as a two-queen colony and named Tower 1 (Colony 2). The bottom colony was renamed Tower 1 (Colony 1). The structure of the hive was as thus: Two deep brood boxes on the bottom named Tower 1 (Colony 1); a queen excluder on top of those brood boxes; honey supers on top of the queen excluder; another queen excluder on top of the honey boxes; and finally one deep brood box on the very top named Tower 1 (Colony 2).
  • July 2013: First honey removal, mid month. 240 lbs. net weight extracted.
  • Aug 2013: Tower 1 (Colony 2) queenless. Hawaiian queens are zero for two, but at least the brood cycle was not interrupted. The top brood box was full of honey, so it was removed and the bees were amalgamated with Tower 1 (Colony 1). I did not paper them because the top and bottom colonies were already a cohesive unit filling the top brood chamber with honey.
  • Aug 2013: Second honey removal, early-Aug. 133 lbs. net weight extracted.
  • Aug 2013: Third honey removal, towards end month. 178 lbs. net weight extracted.
  • Aug 2013: Tower 2 (Colony 2) queen was pinched after the honey flow. The top brood box was removed, and the bees amalgamated with Tower 2 (Colony 1). The top queen was not as good as the bottom queen, and was sacrificed for strength of genetics.
  • Aug 2013: By the end of the month all the honey has now been extracted. The total for the year was 550 lbs. net weight extracted.
  • Aug 2013: Two worker bees from each hive were collected and sent to York University as part of their Canadian Honeybee Genomic Study. The queens in each hive were raised by Colony 1 in each of their respective Towers.
  • Sep 2013: Both hives were treated with Mite Away Quick Strips (MAQS). The queen in Tower 1 was lost during the treatment.
  • Sep 2013: A dadant with a laying queen and bees contained within was introduced, by papering, to Tower 1. New eggs were found in the bottom brood chamber. This post will be updated as the situation unfolds.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

 
Google+